Legacy Research Group
  • Reputation
    (3)
  • Value for Money
    (3)
  • Quality of Information
    (2.5)
  • Features
    (2.5)
  • Product Range
    (2)
Overall
2.6
Comments Rating 0 (0 reviews)

Summary

The Legacy Research Group is an investment publication newsletter service.

Although I do not personally think that the Legacy Research Group is a scam, there are a few things to keep in mind before ordering any of the individual services.

See the full review below for more details.

Pros

  • Positive user reviews.
  • The information might help you make better investment decisions.

Cons

  • Not personalised investment advice.
  • Watch out for auto rebills and unclear refund policies.

Financial Disclaimer: no part of this review should be interpreted as financial advice. The content is for informational purposes only. Payments and Ownership: I DON’T own or work for the Legacy Research Group. If you have payment issues or need to get a refund – you’ll need to contact the Legacy Research Group directly. ALWAYS make sure that you understand the payment and billing arrangements BEFORE subscribing or buying anything. Opinion Disclaimer: the content in this review is ultimately a reflection of my own opinions and is not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, individual, anyone, or anything.

Name:Legacy Research Group
Website:legacyresearch.com
Real owner:Chris Lowe
Platform:The Agora
Type:Investment publications
Price:Various
Trial?No
Money-back guarantee?Various
Rating:2.6
Recommended?Yes – some caution (billing and refunds)
How to join?Via their website + phone

I’m nearing the end of doing all of the reviews for the financial publication services that fall under The Agora network.

So, is the Legacy Research Group a scam?

That’s what I’ll be revealing in this honest Legacy Research Group review.

Screenshot of the Legacy Research Group website.

Image source: legacyresearch.com

What is the Legacy Research Group?

The Legacy Research Group sits under The Agora parent company name.

And the Legacy Research Group itself actually comprises of four financial research firms: Casey Research, Bonner & Partners, Jeff Clark’s Delta Report, and the Palm Beach Research Group.

The purpose of the Legacy Research Group is to provide financial insights and opinions that may help you make more informed investment decisions.

Chris Lowe is cited as being the editor of the Legacy Research Group.

What Does the Legacy Research Group Offer?

Rather than providing a huge array of financial newsletters like many of the other brands that fall inside The Agora network, the Legacy Research Group offers just one service at the time of writing – the Legacy Inner Circle.

The Legacy Inner Circle costs $49 and pulls strategic recommendations from the entire Legacy Research team.

This includes Bill Bonner, Doug Casey, Teeka Tiwari, Jeff Clark, Jeff Brown, E.B. Tucker, Nick Giambruno, Jason Bodner, Marco Wutzer, and more.

Apparently, the goal of the Legacy Inner Circle is ‘…to spot the biggest, most exciting money-making trends in the markets… before the crowd catches on’.

And like many of these sorts of publications, the Legacy Inner Circle tries to differentiate itself by going against the grain of the mainstream media ‘…to show you how the world of money really works’.

The newsletter is issued once per week – at midday each Friday.

Is the Legacy Research Group a Scam or Not?

I’ve already reviewed two of the brands that fall under the Legacy Research Group umbrella and they are not scams.

And in light of what my research has uncovered about the Legacy Research Group as a whole, I’m inclined to say that the Legacy Research Group is a legitimate investment publication service and NOT a scam.

However, there are some caveats.

And I’ll be discussing these right after I’ve shown you the Legacy Research Group reviews that I’ve discovered online.

Legacy Research Group Reviews

There aren’t a lot of individual reviews available for the Legacy Research Group.

But there are plenty for the child brands like Bonner & Partners and Palm Beach.

With that said, I managed to find 13 reviews for the Legacy Research Group on Google reviews – where the aggregate score came to 3.9/5 stars.

Screenshot of Google reviews for the Legacy Research Group.

Good Legacy Research Group Reviews

Of those reviews, the points of praise include:

  • Well written articles.
  • Valuable information to improve investing skills.
  • High quality investment conferences.

Legacy Research Group Complaints

There aren’t many complaints.

Although one user did express their frustration at not being able to contact customer support easily.

My Thoughts On the Legacy Research Group

As I said, I’ve already reviewed some of the brands associated with the Legacy Research Group and The Agora.

And the same issues keep coming up again and again.

So below, I’ve outlined my general advice for dealing with pretty much any kind of these investment newsletter aggregate sites.

1: Don’t Fall For The Marketing Hype

The main thing to remember is that nearly all of these investment publication services are NOT legally allowed to provide personalised investment advice.

But it’s very easy to get drawn in to the sales page hype for the individual products to the point where some folks start to believe that they’re going to get rich following the advice.

This is a very dangerous mindset.

I would instead urge you to view the content as information that could potentially help you make more well rounded investment decisions – rather than an explicit instruction to buy or sell.

2: Check the Refund Policy

Most of these newsletters require you to phone up to place an order.

And I would use this opportunity to clarify with the sales rep what the refund policy is.

Because when I reviewed Bonner and Partners, I discovered that their 90 day guarantee only allowed you to have your refund issued in the form of ‘credits’ that could be used on other products.

And some people who skim read the sale page mistakenly thought that this was a 90 day money back guarantee.

So be sure to clarify for your individual newsletter of choice.

3: Watch Out For Automatic Rebills

Similar to the last point, it’s always a good idea to ask the sales rep what the terms of the billing agreement is.

Because it’s typical of these sorts of subscription services to rebill you automatically every year.

So, you might end up getting a nasty surprise in 12 months if you unknowingly sign up to a service with an automatic rebill and then forget all about it.

Pros

  • Positive user reviews.
  • The information might help you make better investment decisions.

Cons

  • Not personalised investment advice.
  • Watch out for auto rebills and unclear refund policies.

Conclusion: Not a Scam But Be Careful

As I said earlier, I don’t think that the Legacy Research Group or any of its associated brand names are outright scams.

But I advise that you proceed with caution when subscribing to a service and keep the above points in mind.

If you have any direct experience with the Legacy Research Group – please tell me about it in the comments section below.

What’s the Alternative?

At the moment, I’m recommending Capitalist Exploits as my #1 investment opportunity service.

This is because very few people know about this service, but of the ones that do – they are giving it 5/5 star reviews on the major review sites like Trustpilot.

And having actually seen the investment information content in the members only area – I have to say that I’m impressed.

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